Month: August 2021

People Who Bought X Also Bought …? An Introduction to NumPy Association Analysis

Imagine you are Jeff Bezos. One of the most successful features of your company Amazon is product recommendation. “People who bought X also bought Y.” Roughly speaking, this feature alone has made you billions. For you, Jeff Bezos, product recommendation is the most important algorithm in the world, isn’t it? In this article, you’ll learn …

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Python Escape Characters

Python Escape Characters Table Escape Character Explanation \’ Single Quote \” Double Quote \n Newline Character \t Tabular Character \b Backspace Character \r Carriage Return \\ Backslash \ Form Feed \ooo Octal Value \xhh Hex Value Examples The following examples show the working of the different escape characters in a Python context. We provide the …

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NumPy all() – A Simple Guide with Video

Syntax numpy.all(a, axis=None, out=None, keepdims=<no value>, *, where=<no value>) Argument Type Description a array_like Input array axis None, int, or tuple of int Optional. One axis or multiple axes along which logical AND should be performed. Per default, it computes logical AND on the flat array. If this is a tuple of integers, calculates logical …

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Flask vs Django: Comparing the Two Most Popular Python Web Frameworks

When it comes to developing web applications in Python there are lots of frameworks. Some examples are Pyramid, Web2Py, Bottle or CherryPy, among others. However, the two most popular ones are Flask and Django. We can confirm this fact by having a look at the most starred Python libraries in GitHub: As we will see …

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How to Print the Full NumPy Array Without Truncation?

Problem Formulation In some shell environments, when printing a large NumPy array, the Python interpreter automatically displays only a small, truncated portion of the array, using the triple dots ‘…’ to indicate that some values are missing in the textual representation of the array. Here’s an example of a truncated array: Here’s how that looks …

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