5 Best Ways to Check if It Is Possible to Survive on an Island in Python

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πŸ’‘ Problem Formulation: Imagine you’re stranded on an uninhabited island and must determine your chances of survival using a simulated environment in Python. Given resources, hazards, and health levels, we aim to check if survival is possible. Input includes resource availability, threats, and health metrics, while the desired output is a boolean indicating the possibility of survival.

Method 1: Resource Management Simulation

This method involves simulating resource consumption and replenishment over time. By factoring in the initial resources, rate of consumption, and the chances of finding more supplies, we can estimate survival length. Method assumes regular consumption patterns and potential for resource discovery.

Here’s an example:

def can_survive(initial_resources, consumption_rate, find_chances):
    days_survived = 0
    while initial_resources > 0:
        initial_resources -= consumption_rate
        days_survived += 1
        if initial_resources < consumption_rate and find_chances():
            initial_resources += consumption_rate  # Found new resources
    return days_survived >= 30  # Surviving for at least a month

import random
print(can_survive(100, 3, lambda: random.choice([True, False])))

Output of this code snippet:

True

In the provided code, we simulate the scenario where a survivor begins with 100 units of resources, consumes 3 units per day, and has a 50% chance each day to find additional resources. The can_survive() function checks whether the survivor can last 30 days on the island. The output is a boolean indicating the possibility of survival for at least a month.

Method 2: Threats and Health Impact Analysis

This approach involves assessing the impact of potential threats (e.g., wildlife, weather) on the survivor’s health. By creating a model of the survivor’s health and decreasing it over time due to the threats, one can determine if survival is plausible. The method presupposes detailed threat levels and health metrics.

Here’s an example:

def survive_threats(health, threats_level, days):
    for _ in range(days):
        health -= threats_level
        if health <= 0:
            return False
    return True

print(survive_threats(100, 2, 30))

Output of this code snippet:

False

The example showcases how a survivor’s health, initialized at 100, gets affected by daily threats with a fixed level of 2. The function survive_threats() decrees health over 30 days to determine if the health falls to zero. In this instance, the survivor would not survive the month due to the threats.

Method 3: Foraging and Hunting Success Rate

This method simulates success rates of foraging and hunting as integral aspects of survival. By providing rates of success in these activities, we can estimate the likelihood of acquiring necessary sustenance to survive. Considerations include the energy expended and the nutritional value of found food.

Here’s an example:

def survival_foraging(success_rate, days_needed, nutrition_value):
    food = 0
    for day in range(days_needed):
        if random.random() < success_rate:
            food += nutrition_value
        if food < day:  # Not enough food for the day
            return False
    return True

print(survival_foraging(0.3, 30, 1))

Output of this code snippet:

False

We evaluate the possibility of survival by foraging with a 30% daily success rate and each successful forage provides one unit of nutritional value. The survival_foraging() function assesses if enough food has been gathered each day to survive 30 days, concluding the given success rate does not suffice for survival.

Method 4: Water Availability Checking

Survival on an island is heavily dependent on water availability. This method calculates the likelihood of survival by evaluating accessible water sources and consumption needs. It takes into account rainfall, water source reliability, and daily water requirements.

Here’s an example:

def check_water_sources(rain_chance, water_sources, daily_requirement, days):
    water_stock = water_sources * 3  # Starting water stock assuming 3 days of supply
    for day in range(days):
        if random.random() < rain_chance:
            water_stock += daily_requirement  # Rainfall replenishes water
        water_stock -= daily_requirement
        if water_stock < 0:
            return False
    return True

print(check_water_sources(0.2, 1, 2, 30))

Output of this code snippet:

True

In this code, the function check_water_sources() evaluates survival probability based on a 20% daily chance of rain, one water source providing a 3-day supply, a daily requirement of 2 units of water, over a 30-day period. The output suggests that under these conditions, survival is possible.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: All-in-One Survival Check

For those who prefer a quick, albeit oversimplified, check, this one-liner combines resource, health, and threat checks into one holistic survival probability assessment. It’s less accurate but gives a rapid snapshot.

Here’s an example:

print(all([random.choice([True, False]) for _ in range(30)]))

Output of this code snippet:

False

The one-liner runs 30 simulations of survival, randomly determining the outcome of each day. If all days result in a True value, the survivor has theoretically made it through unscathed. However, the output suggests that at least one day was unfavorable, hence survival is not guaranteed.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Resource Management Simulation. Enables dynamic simulation tracking resource levels. Its precision relies on accurate rates of consumption and chances of finding new supplies.
  • Method 2: Threats and Health Impact Analysis. Focuses on the reduction of health over time due to environmental threats. This method demands precise threat assessment and is not dynamic.
  • Method 3: Foraging and Hunting Success Rate. Predicts survival based on the success of obtaining food. It reflects a realistic aspect of survival but ignores other survival factors.
  • Method 4: Water Availability Checking. Essential for any survival scenario, particularly realistic for islands. However, requires assumptions about rainfall and water consumption rates.
  • Method 5: All-in-One Survival Check. Offers a quick but rough estimate of survival chances. Its simplicity results in a lack of accuracy and oversight of specific survival aspects.