5 Best Ways to Convert Binary to Gray Code in Python

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πŸ’‘ Problem Formulation: Converting binary numbers to Gray code is essential in digital communication to minimize errors during data transmission. This article delves into five Python methods to perform this conversion. Suppose we have a binary value 0111, the equivalent Gray code should be 0100.

Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations

This method involves manipulating the binary number using bitwise XOR (^) and right shift (>>) operations. A binary number is converted to Gray code by XORing it with a version of itself that has been shifted one bit to the right. The function below illustrates how to perform this operation in Python.

Here’s an example:

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray(n):
    n = int(n, 2)
    n ^= (n >> 1)
    return bin(n)[2:]

print(binary_to_gray('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray() first converts the binary string to an integer, then it performs the XOR operation between the number and its right shifted version by one bit. The result is then converted back to a binary string.

Method 2: Using String Manipulation

This method utilizes string manipulation to convert each binary digit to its corresponding Gray code digit. The first digit remains the same, and each subsequent digit is determined by checking if the preceding binary digits are different.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray(n):
    n = int(n, 2)
    n ^= (n >> 1)
    return bin(n)[2:]

print(binary_to_gray('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray() first converts the binary string to an integer, then it performs the XOR operation between the number and its right shifted version by one bit. The result is then converted back to a binary string.

Method 2: Using String Manipulation

This method utilizes string manipulation to convert each binary digit to its corresponding Gray code digit. The first digit remains the same, and each subsequent digit is determined by checking if the preceding binary digits are different.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray(n):
    n = int(n, 2)
    n ^= (n >> 1)
    return bin(n)[2:]

print(binary_to_gray('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray() first converts the binary string to an integer, then it performs the XOR operation between the number and its right shifted version by one bit. The result is then converted back to a binary string.

Method 2: Using String Manipulation

This method utilizes string manipulation to convert each binary digit to its corresponding Gray code digit. The first digit remains the same, and each subsequent digit is determined by checking if the preceding binary digits are different.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray(n):
    n = int(n, 2)
    n ^= (n >> 1)
    return bin(n)[2:]

print(binary_to_gray('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray() first converts the binary string to an integer, then it performs the XOR operation between the number and its right shifted version by one bit. The result is then converted back to a binary string.

Method 2: Using String Manipulation

This method utilizes string manipulation to convert each binary digit to its corresponding Gray code digit. The first digit remains the same, and each subsequent digit is determined by checking if the preceding binary digits are different.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray(n):
    n = int(n, 2)
    n ^= (n >> 1)
    return bin(n)[2:]

print(binary_to_gray('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray() first converts the binary string to an integer, then it performs the XOR operation between the number and its right shifted version by one bit. The result is then converted back to a binary string.

Method 2: Using String Manipulation

This method utilizes string manipulation to convert each binary digit to its corresponding Gray code digit. The first digit remains the same, and each subsequent digit is determined by checking if the preceding binary digits are different.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray(n):
    n = int(n, 2)
    n ^= (n >> 1)
    return bin(n)[2:]

print(binary_to_gray('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray() first converts the binary string to an integer, then it performs the XOR operation between the number and its right shifted version by one bit. The result is then converted back to a binary string.

Method 2: Using String Manipulation

This method utilizes string manipulation to convert each binary digit to its corresponding Gray code digit. The first digit remains the same, and each subsequent digit is determined by checking if the preceding binary digits are different.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray(n):
    n = int(n, 2)
    n ^= (n >> 1)
    return bin(n)[2:]

print(binary_to_gray('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray() first converts the binary string to an integer, then it performs the XOR operation between the number and its right shifted version by one bit. The result is then converted back to a binary string.

Method 2: Using String Manipulation

This method utilizes string manipulation to convert each binary digit to its corresponding Gray code digit. The first digit remains the same, and each subsequent digit is determined by checking if the preceding binary digits are different.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray(n):
    n = int(n, 2)
    n ^= (n >> 1)
    return bin(n)[2:]

print(binary_to_gray('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray() first converts the binary string to an integer, then it performs the XOR operation between the number and its right shifted version by one bit. The result is then converted back to a binary string.

Method 2: Using String Manipulation

This method utilizes string manipulation to convert each binary digit to its corresponding Gray code digit. The first digit remains the same, and each subsequent digit is determined by checking if the preceding binary digits are different.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray(n):
    n = int(n, 2)
    n ^= (n >> 1)
    return bin(n)[2:]

print(binary_to_gray('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray() first converts the binary string to an integer, then it performs the XOR operation between the number and its right shifted version by one bit. The result is then converted back to a binary string.

Method 2: Using String Manipulation

This method utilizes string manipulation to convert each binary digit to its corresponding Gray code digit. The first digit remains the same, and each subsequent digit is determined by checking if the preceding binary digits are different.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray(n):
    n = int(n, 2)
    n ^= (n >> 1)
    return bin(n)[2:]

print(binary_to_gray('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray() first converts the binary string to an integer, then it performs the XOR operation between the number and its right shifted version by one bit. The result is then converted back to a binary string.

Method 2: Using String Manipulation

This method utilizes string manipulation to convert each binary digit to its corresponding Gray code digit. The first digit remains the same, and each subsequent digit is determined by checking if the preceding binary digits are different.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.
def binary_to_gray(n):
    n = int(n, 2)
    n ^= (n >> 1)
    return bin(n)[2:]

print(binary_to_gray('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray() first converts the binary string to an integer, then it performs the XOR operation between the number and its right shifted version by one bit. The result is then converted back to a binary string.

Method 2: Using String Manipulation

This method utilizes string manipulation to convert each binary digit to its corresponding Gray code digit. The first digit remains the same, and each subsequent digit is determined by checking if the preceding binary digits are different.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_string(bin_num):
    gray = bin_num[0]
    for i in range(1, len(bin_num)):
        gray += str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1]))
    return gray

print(binary_to_gray_string('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_string() function takes the binary string and iterates through its digits, starting from the second digit. It XORs each digit with the one preceding it and appends the result to the Gray code string.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join

This method provides a more Pythonic approach by using a list comprehension and the join() method to create the Gray code. It combines the simplicity of string manipulation with the conciseness and readability of Python’s list comprehension.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_list(bin_num):
    return bin_num[0] + ''.join(str(int(bin_num[i]) ^ int(bin_num[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(bin_num)))

print(binary_to_gray_list('0111'))

Output: 0100

The binary_to_gray_list() function works similarly to the string manipulation example but uses list comprehension and the join() method for a more succinct implementation.

Method 4: Using Recursion

For those who prefer a recursive approach, this method allows us to apply the Gray code conversion rules in a recursive fashion, hence reducing the imperative loop and relying on the function’s call stack to resolve the problem.

Here’s an example:

def binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num):
    if len(bin_num) == 1:
        return bin_num
    else:
        return binary_to_gray_recursive(bin_num[:-1]) + str(int(bin_num[-1]) ^ int(bin_num[-2]))

print(binary_to_gray_recursive('0111'))

Output: 0100

The function binary_to_gray_recursive() checks if the length of the binary number is 1, in which case it returns that digit. Otherwise, it recursively calls itself with all but the last digit and then appends the XOR of the last two digits.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda Function

For an elegant and minimalistic solution, a lambda function can be utilized. This one-liner employs a similar conversion logic as other methods, but with the added succinctness that lambda functions provide.

Here’s an example:

binary_to_gray_lambda = lambda b: b[0] + ''.join(str(int(b[i]) ^ int(b[i-1])) for i in range(1, len(b)))

print(binary_to_gray_lambda('0111'))

Output: 0100

The lambda function binary_to_gray_lambda() encapsulates the list comprehension method within a lambda, providing an inline and compact solution.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Using Bitwise XOR and Right Shift Operations. Offers a traditional and straightforward approach. Might not be the most Pythonic.
  • Method 2: Using String Manipulation. Simple to understand and implement. May not be the most efficient for long binary strings.
  • Method 3: Using List Comprehension and Join. Pythonic and concise. Combines readability with Python’s powerful built-in features.
  • Method 4: Using Recursion. Elegant for those who prefer recursive solutions but may suffer from stack overflow for very long binary strings.
  • Method 5: Using a Lambda Function. The most succinct solution. However, lambdas can be less readable for complex operations or those unfamiliar with the syntax.