5 Best Ways to Create a Borderless Fullscreen Application Using Python 3 Tkinter

Rate this post
5 Best Ways to Create a Borderless Fullscreen Application Using Python 3 Tkinter

πŸ’‘ Problem Formulation: Building a borderless fullscreen application in Python can enhance the user experience by providing a clean, unobstructed interface. This article aims to demonstrate various methods to achieve a borderless fullscreen window using Python 3’s Tkinter library. We’ll transform a standard Tkinter window into a seamless fullscreen experience β€” perfect for kiosk applications, media players, or artistic installations.

Method 1: Using Overrideredirect

This method involves using the overrideredirect() function from Tkinter which removes the window border and title bar. By also setting the geometry to the screen’s width and height, we achieve a fullscreen effect.

Here’s an example:

from tkinter import Tk

root = Tk()
root.overrideredirect(True)  # Removes the window border and title bar
root.geometry("{0}x{1}+0+0".format(root.winfo_screenwidth(), root.winfo_screenheight()))

root.mainloop()
        

Output: A fullscreen window without borders covering the entire screen.

This code snippet initializes a Tkinter window with root = Tk(). The overrideredirect(True) call removes the window’s border and title bar. The geometry of the window is set to match the screen dimensions, ensuring that it covers the entire screen in a fullscreen manner.

Method 2: Fullscreen Attribute

The attributes() method provides a more straightforward way to set the fullscreen state of the window using the -fullscreen attribute. It doesn’t require setting geometry and ensures the window takes up the entire display.

Here’s an example:

from tkinter import Tk

root = Tk()
root.attributes('-fullscreen', True)  # Directly sets the window to fullscreen

root.mainloop()
        

Output: A fullscreen application taking up the entire display.

This example leverages the attributes() method to set the -fullscreen attribute to True, turning the window into a fullscreen display immediately. The simplicity of this method makes it a popular choice for quickly creating fullscreen applications.

Method 3: Maximizing Window Size

By setting the window size to match the screen dimensions manually, we can simulate a fullscreen window. However, this does not remove window decorations but maximizes the window to cover the screen.

Here’s an example:

from tkinter import Tk

root = Tk()
root.state('zoomed')  # Maximize the window to fill the screen

root.mainloop()
        

Output: A maximized window filling the entire screen space.

With this code, the state('zoomed') function maximizes the window to cover the screen. Although this isn’t a true fullscreen mode (as it retains the title bar and borders), it does scale the window to fill the available display area.

Method 4: Hiding the Taskbar

In combination with maximizing the window size, hiding the taskbar can provide a more immersive fullscreen experience. This method may require additional tweaking for different operating systems.

Here’s an example:

from tkinter import Tk

root = Tk()
root.attributes('-fullscreen', True)  # Fullscreen on
root.attributes('-topmost', True)     # Window stays above the taskbar

root.mainloop()
        

Output: A fullscreen window above the taskbar, achieving a cleaner borderless look.

Along with the full-screen attribute, setting -topmost to True ensures our application remains above the taskbar. While not universally applicable across all operating systems or configurations, this method adds another level of focus on the application content by reducing external distractions.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Combination Approach

Combining overrideredirect() and -fullscreen attributes into one swift action might be all that’s needed for specific applications to achieve a borderless fullscreen effect.

Here’s an example:

from tkinter import Tk

root = Tk()
# Forces fullscreen with no window decorations or taskbar
root.overrideredirect(True)
root.attributes('-fullscreen', True)

root.mainloop()
        

Output: A clean and immersive borderless fullscreen application.

This approach is a hybrid solution. It utilizes the immediate effect of the -fullscreen attribute while also ensuring no window decorations with overrideredirect(True). Be mindful that this can make it harder to exit the application since standard controls are not present.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Overrideredirect. Gives full control over the window appearance. However, it may make exiting the fullscreen mode less intuitive as window managers’ control is bypassed.
  • Method 2: Fullscreen Attribute. This is the simplest and most straightforward method for creating a fullscreen application. One limitation is that it may behave differently across different window managers.
  • Method 3: Maximizing Window Size. The method is good for quickly creating a maximized window but retains window decorations which may not be desired for a truly ‘fullscreen’ experience.
  • Method 4: Hiding the Taskbar. This can help create a more immersive experience but requires careful consideration of cross-platform behavior and user accessibility.
  • Method 5: Combination Approach. Provides a comprehensive fullscreen experience with no distractions. Care must be taken to allow for a way to exit the fullscreen mode since standard controls are hidden.