5 Best Ways to Enclose Patterns into Bold Tags in Python

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💡 Problem Formulation: This article provides solutions for wrapping specific patterns of text within a string into the HTML <strong> tag using Python. This functionality is commonly required in web development when dynamic text needs to be highlighted. For instance, given the input string “I love Python programming!”, we may want to emphasize the word “Python” by transforming it into “I love Python programming!”.

Method 1: Using String Replacement

This method involves identifying the target substring and directly replacing it with the substring enclosed in <strong> tags. It’s suitable for cases where the string to be bolded is known beforehand and does not vary. This approach is straightforward, but not flexible for patterns that may change or for multiple occurrences of the pattern.

Here’s an example:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.
def bold_pattern_simple(text, pattern):
    return text.replace(pattern, f"<strong>{pattern}</strong>")

result = bold_pattern_simple("I love Python programming!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming!

This code snippet defines a function bold_pattern_simple() that takes a string and a pattern, and returns a new string with the pattern wrapped in bold tags. It is efficient for replacing a single, known word, but not for patterns or multiple instances.

Method 2: Using Regular Expressions

Regular expressions provide a powerful way to match complex patterns in strings. In Python, the re module can be used to search and replace patterns with flexibility. This method can bold multiple occurrences and varying patterns, which is not possible with simple string replacement.

Here’s an example:

import re

def bold_pattern_regex(text, pattern):
    return re.sub(pattern, lambda x: f"<strong>{x.group(0)}</strong>", text)

result = bold_pattern_regex("I love Python programming in Python!", r"Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This code snippet utilizes the re.sub() function to search for a pattern and replace it with the bold tags around the matched text. It’s more flexible and powerful for dynamically generated patterns and multiple occurrences.

Method 3: Using BeautifulSoup

BeautifulSoup is a Python library for parsing HTML and XML documents. It can be used for complex tasks like web scraping but can also be repurposed for dynamically inserting HTML tags within a string. This method is ideal for scenarios where the input is already HTML, or you need to manipulate HTML elements robustly.

Here’s an example:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

def bold_pattern_bs4(text, pattern):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    text_elements = soup.find_all(string=re.compile(pattern))
    for element in text_elements:
        bold_tag = soup.new_tag("strong")
        bold_tag.string = element
        element.replace_with(bold_tag)
    return str(soup)

result = bold_pattern_bs4("I love Python programming in Python!", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

In this example, BeautifulSoup is used to search for strings matching the pattern and wrap them in <strong> tags. It offers more fine-grained control over the HTML and is suited for more complex scenarios.

Method 4: Using the string.Formatter class

The Formatter class in the Python standard library provides an advanced way to build strings. By customizing the format specification, you can implement conditionally wrapping substrings in HTML tags. This method is less straightforward but offers an interesting alternative using Python’s built-in capabilities.

Here’s an example:

from string import Formatter

class BoldFormatter(Formatter):
    def format_field(self, value, format_spec):
        if format_spec == "bold":
            return f"<strong>{value}</strong>"
        else:
            return super().format_field(value, format_spec)

formatter = BoldFormatter()
result = formatter.format("{0:bold} love {1} programming!", "I", "Python")
print(result)

Output:

<strong>I</strong> love Python programming!

This code snippet shows the creation of a BoldFormatter class to define a new format specification that bolds strings. This method offers a template-based approach to wrapping text but might be overkill for simple cases.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using a Lambda and map()

For a quick one-liner solution in Python, we can combine a lambda function with the map() function to apply the bold tags to each matched pattern. This is great for simplicity and compactness but lacks the readability and flexibility of the previous methods.

Here’s an example:

text = "I love Python programming in Python!"
pattern = "Python"
result = "".join(map(lambda x: f"<strong>{x}</strong>" if pattern in x else x, text.split(pattern)))
print(result)

Output:

I love <strong>Python</strong> programming in <strong>Python</strong>!

This one-liner splits the input string at the pattern, maps the strong tags insertion, and joins the pieces back. It’s terse and effective for simple cases but less maintainable and readable.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: String Replacement. Straightforward and simple. Limited to known, single patterns.
  • Method 2: Regular Expressions. Flexible and powerful. Might be overkill for simple replacements.
  • Method 3: BeautifulSoup. Ideal for HTML manipulation. Overhead of an external library may not make sense for trivial tasks.
  • Method 4: Formatter Class. Advanced and template-based. More complex than necessary for simple bolding tasks.
  • Method 5: Lambda and map(). Compact. Less readable and not suitable for complex patterns or replacements.