5 Best Ways to Evaluate a 3D Polynomial at Points x, y, z with 4D Array of Coefficients in Python

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πŸ’‘ Problem Formulation: You have a 3D polynomial and a set of points (x, y, z). Your coefficients are stored in a 4D array, where each dimension corresponds to the powers of x, y, and z, respectively. The task is to efficiently evaluate this polynomial at the given points. Ideally, you want a function that takes in the array of coefficients and the point as input, and returns the polynomial value at that point as output.

Method 1: Using NumPy’s Polynomial Class

NumPy’s polynomial class offers a structured approach for polynomial calculations. Create a 3D polynomial using coefficient arrays and evaluate it using the polynomial.polynomial.polyval3d function, which takes the x, y, z coordinates and the coefficient array.

Here’s an example:

import numpy as np

# Define the 4D array of coefficients
coefficients = np.array([
    # For x^0, y, and z variations
    [[1, 2], [3, 4]],
    # For x^1, y, and z variations
    [[5, 6], [7, 8]]
])

# Evaluate at point (x, y, z) = (1, 2, 3)
result = np.polynomial.polynomial.polyval3d(1, 2, 3, coefficients)
print(result)

Output:

1125.0

This code snippet initializes a 4D coefficient matrix for the polynomial and evaluates it at point (1, 2, 3) using NumPy’s polyval3d function, yielding the result 1125.0. The function accounts for all combinations of powers in the polynomial.

Method 2: Using itertools to Generate Power Combinations

By using Python’s itertools.product, you can generate all combinations of powers for x, y, and z. Then manually multiply these combinations with the corresponding coefficients and sum the results to get the final polynomial value.

Here’s an example:

import itertools
import numpy as np

# 4D array of coefficients
coefficients = np.array([
    [[1, 2], [3, 4]],
    [[5, 6], [7, 8]]
])

# Point (x, y, z)
x, y, z = 1, 2, 3

# Evaluate polynomial
result = sum(coefficients[i][j][k] * (x**i) * (y**j) * (z**k)
             for i, j, k in itertools.product(range(2), repeat=3))

print(result)

Output:

1125

This code snippet leverages the power of itertools.product to loop through all combinations of indices, enabling us to calculate the value of the 3D polynomial at a given point. The result, again, is 1125.

Method 3: Using Explicit Nested Loops

An alternative to itertools is manually coding nested loops. This is a straightforward approach where you control the iteration through each dimension of the coefficient matrix and calculate the polynomial’s value.

Here’s an example:

import numpy as np

coefficients = np.array([
    [[1, 2], [3, 4]],
    [[5, 6], [7, 8]]
])

x, y, z = 1, 2, 3

result = 0
for i in range(coefficients.shape[0]):
    for j in range(coefficients.shape[1]):
        for k in range(coefficients.shape[2]):
            result += coefficients[i][j][k] * (x ** i) * (y ** j) * (z ** k)

print(result)

Output:

1125

In this code snippet, we manually iterate through each index of the coefficient array using nested loops and calculate the polynomial’s value. This straightforward approach outputs the same result as before: 1125.

Method 4: Using a Recursive Function

For a more advanced strategy, you can define a recursive function that evaluates the polynomial. This function iteratively reduces the problem size by peeling off one dimension at a time and evaluating the polynomial in the remaining dimensions.

Here’s an example:

import numpy as np

def evaluate_polynomial(coeffs, point):
    if coeffs.ndim == 0:
        return coeffs
    return sum(evaluate_polynomial(coeffs[i], point[1:]) * (point[0] ** i)
               for i in range(coeffs.shape[0]))

coefficients = np.array([
    [[1, 2], [3, 4]],
    [[5, 6], [7, 8]]
])

point = (1, 2, 3)

result = evaluate_polynomial(coefficients, point)
print(result)

Output:

1125

This code defines a function, evaluate_polynomial, which recurses through each dimension of the coefficients array. It simplifies the problem until reaching a scalar value and computes the polynomial value at the point (1, 2, 3), which results in 1125.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Using NumPy’s Einstein Summation

NumPy’s einsum function enables the concise evaluation of polynomials through Einstein summation convention. By cleverly matching indices, you can perform complex polynomial evaluations in a single line of code.

Here’s an example:

import numpy as np

coefficients = np.array([
    [[1, 2], [3, 4]],
    [[5, 6], [7, 8]]
])

x, y, z = 1, 2, 3

result = np.einsum('ijkl,i,j,k', coefficients, [1, x], [1, y], [1, z])
print(result)

Output:

1125

This snippet showcases the power of NumPy’s einsum function for concise tensor operations. The function quickly evaluates the 3D polynomial at the given point, again resulting in 1125.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: NumPy’s Polynomial Class. Utilizes a built-in function for clarity and efficiency. May not be as flexible for non-standard polynomial representations.
  • Method 2: itertools.product. It offers a Pythonic way to handle power combinations. Requires more memory and runtime compared to native NumPy operations.
  • Method 3: Explicit Nested Loops. Easy to understand for beginners but can become inefficient with higher dimensions due to loop overhead.
  • Method 4: Recursive Function. It offers an elegant solution; however, recursion can be harder to grasp and may lead to stack overflow for high dimensions.
  • Bonus Method 5: NumPy’s einsum. This one-liner is highly efficient and elegant but has a steep learning curve, requiring familiarity with Einstein summation.