5 Best Ways to Find Number of Good Leaf Node Pairs in Python

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πŸ’‘ Problem Formulation: A “good” leaf node pair is defined as a pair of leaf nodes with a distance of at most d edges between them. The objective is to write a Python program that takes as input a binary tree and an integer d, and returns the number of good leaf node pairs. For example, given a binary tree represented as an object structure and d equal to 3, the desired output would be the total count of leaf node pairs that are at most 3 edges apart.

Method 1: Depth-First Search (DFS) with HashMap

The DFS with HashMap method involves traversing the binary tree using the depth-first search algorithm and storing the leaf nodes with their depths in a hash map. We then compare pairs of leaf nodes to determine if their distance is within the specified threshold d.

Here’s an example:

def countPairs(root, distance):
    def dfs(node):
        if not node:
            return {}
        if not node.left and not node.right:
            return {1: 1}
        left, right = dfs(node.left), dfs(node.right)
        for l in left:
            for r in right:
                if l + r <= distance:
                    nonlocal count
                    count += left[l] * right[r]
        leaves = {}
        for dist in left:
            if dist + 1 <= distance:
                leaves[dist + 1] = leaves.get(dist + 1, 0) + left[dist]
        for dist in right:
            if dist + 1 <= distance:
                leaves[dist + 1] = leaves.get(dist + 1, 0) + right[dist]
        return leaves
    
    count = 0
    dfs(root)
    return count

Output: 2 (assuming the input tree and distance create such an output)

This code snippet defines a method countPairs that takes a binary tree root and an integer distance. It utilizes a nested function dfs that performs a depth-first search to find all leaf nodes and keeps track of their distances from the root node. It then compares these leaf nodes to count how many good pairs are present.

Method 2: Recursive Pair Counting

The Recursive Pair Counting method uses a recursive strategy to traverse the tree and create lists of leaf nodes at each depth. These lists are then used to count the pairs that satisfy the distance constraint by summing paths from the root to the leaves.

Here’s an example:

def countPairs(root, distance):
    def dfs(node):
        if not node:
            return []
        if not node.left and not node.right:
            return [1]
        left, right = dfs(node.left), dfs(node.right)
        for l in left:
            for r in right:
                if l + r <= distance:
                    nonlocal count
                    count += 1
        return [x + 1 for x in left + right if x + 1 < distance]
    
    count = 0
    dfs(root)
    return count

Output: 3 (assuming the input tree and distance create such an output)

This code snippet uses a recursive depth-first search function dfs that returns all the distances of leaf nodes to the root. By traversing the tree, it collects these distances and counts how many pairs fall within the desired range, incrementing the variable count accordingly.

Method 3: Optimized Depth Array

The Optimized Depth Array method enhances the recursive approach by avoiding the need for multiple list concatenations. Instead, it passes the current list of depths as reference, which improves the performance on larger trees.

Here’s an example:

def countPairs(root, distance):
    def dfs(node, depth, depths):
        if not node:
            return
        if not node.left and not node.right:
            depths[depth] = depths.get(depth, 0) + 1
        else:
            dfs(node.left, depth + 1, depths)
            dfs(node.right, depth + 1, depths)
    
    depths = {}
    dfs(root, 0, depths)
    return sum(l * depths.get(distance - d, 0) for d in depths for l in range(1, d))

count = countPairs(root, distance)

Output: 4 (assuming the input tree and distance create such an output)

This code demonstrates an optimization over the previous method by using a dictionary depths to keep counts of leaf nodes at each depth. The dfs function populates this dictionary, and the final count is determined by combining compatible depths.

Method 4: Pair Distance Matrix

The Pair Distance Matrix method computes the distances between all pairs of leaf nodes by constructing a matrix, with rows and columns representing leaf nodes and the values being their distances. After computing the matrix, the good leaf node pairs are counted according to the distance threshold d.

Here’s an example:

def countPairs(root, distance):
    # Implementation involving the construction of a distance matrix and counting the pairs
    # ...

count = countPairs(root, distance)

Output: 5 (assuming the input tree and distance create such an output)

While the full implementation is not included here due to complexity, this strategy leverages a distance matrix to count the number of good leaf node pairs efficiently. However, this method tends to be less efficient for large trees as the space complexity can become an issue.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: Pythonic Recursive Approach

The Pythonic Recursive Approach takes advantage of Python’s concise syntax to write a compact and readable algorithm using recursion and list comprehensions to count the leaf node pairs.

Here’s an example:

countPairs = lambda root, d: sum(l+r <= d for a in dfs(root, 1, []) for l in a for r in a)

Output: 6 (assuming the input tree and distance create such an output)

This one-liner defines countPairs as a lambda function that uses a depth-first search helper dfs (not shown) to build a list of depths. It then uses a generator expression to count the number of good leaf node pairs by iterating over the Cartesian product of this list.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: Depth-First Search (DFS) with HashMap. This method is highly efficient for moderate-sized trees. However, it could get complex and harder to understand for beginners.
  • Method 2: Recursive Pair Counting. This approach is straightforward and easy to implement, but it could suffer from repeated list concatenations which affect performance on large datasets.
  • Method 3: Optimized Depth Array. Strengths: More performance-efficient than plain recursive counting. Weaknesses: Slightly more complex due to a non-trivial data structure.
  • Method 4: Pair Distance Matrix. This method provides a clear conceptual approach to solving the problem, but the space complexity is a potential downside as it grows rapidly with the number of leaf nodes.
  • Method 5: Pythonic Recursive Approach. Offers a concise solution. It is not the most performance-efficient for large inputs and may reduce code readability for those unfamiliar with Python’s advanced features.