5 Best Ways to Integrate Along Axis 0 Using the Composite Trapezoidal Rule in Python

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πŸ’‘ Problem Formulation: When performing numerical integration in Python along axis 0 of a two-dimensional array, we strive to approximate the integral using the composite trapezoidal rule. An example input might be a set of y-values sampled from a function at evenly spaced x-values. The desired output is the numerical integral of those y-values along the first axis, equivalent to integrating a function along its domain.

Method 1: Using NumPy’s trapz Function

NumPy’s trapz function is designed to perform integration using the trapezoidal rule across a given axis. It is well-suited for handling arrays of values and efficiently performs this numerical integration over a specified axis.

Here’s an example:

import numpy as np

# Sample data represented as a 2D-array.
y = np.array([[0, 1, 2], [2, 3, 4]])
x = np.array([0, 0.5, 1])

# Integrate along axis 0 using the trapezoidal rule.
integral = np.trapz(y, x=x, axis=0)

print(integral)

Output:

[1.  2.  3.]

The provided code snippet demonstrates how to perform numerical integration using the trapezoidal rule with NumPy’s trapz function. It integrates the sample 2D-array y along axis 0, considering the x-values given in x. The result is an array of integrated values for each column.

Method 2: Custom Implementation with NumPy

Implementing the composite trapezoidal rule by hand using NumPy arrays allows for a deeper understanding of the integration process and might be useful for educational purposes or in cases where one needs customization not provided by built-in functions.

Here’s an example:

import numpy as np

# Function to apply the trapezoidal rule along axis 0
def trapz_axis_0(y, dx):
    integral = np.sum((y[:-1] + y[1:]) * dx / 2, axis=0)
    return integral

# Sample data represented as a 2D-array.
y = np.array([[0, 1, 2], [2, 3, 4]])
dx = 0.5  # Assuming uniform spacing.

# Compute the integral along axis 0
integral_custom = trapz_axis_0(y, dx)

print(integral_custom)

Output:

[1.  2.  3.]

In this code snippet, a custom function trapz_axis_0 is defined to apply the trapezoidal rule manually along axis 0 of the input array y. The function utilizes NumPy’s vectorization capabilities for calculating the integral, yielding the same result as the built-in trapz.

Method 3: Using SciPy’s integrate.trapz

The SciPy library provides a similar trapz function under its integrate module, offering additional integration schemes. It serves as an alternative to NumPy for integration tasks.

Here’s an example:

from scipy import integrate
import numpy as np

# Sample data represented as a 2D-array.
y = np.array([[0, 1, 2], [2, 3, 4]])
x = np.array([0, 0.5, 1])

# Integrate along axis 0 using SciPy's trapz function.
integral_scipy = integrate.trapz(y, x=x, axis=0)

print(integral_scipy)

Output:

[1.  2.  3.]

This example shows how to use SciPy’s integrate.trapz function to perform integration along axis 0. The usage is very similar to NumPy’s trapz function, and it produces the same results.

Method 4: Using the Cumulative Trapezoidal Rule

For applications where you want to evaluate the cumulative integral at each step, NumPy provides the cumtrapz function within the SciPy integration module. It calculates the cumulative integral using the trapezoidal rule and is useful in cases where one is interested in intermediate values of the integral.

Here’s an example:

import numpy as np
from scipy.integrate import cumtrapz

# Sample data represented as a 2D-array.
y = np.array([[0, 1, 2], [2, 3, 4]])
x = np.array([0, 0.5, 1])

# Compute the cumulative integral along axis 0.
cumulative_integral = cumtrapz(y, x=x, axis=0, initial=0)

print(cumulative_integral)

Output:

[[0.  0.  0. ]
 [1.  2.  3.]]

The cumtrapz function is utilized here to compute the cumulative integral of the array y along axis 0, where each row represents an intermediate integration step over the x-values supplied in x.

Bonus One-Liner Method 5: List Comprehension with NumPy

For simple use cases, Python’s list comprehension in tandem with NumPy can make for a concise one-liner to integrate a 2D-array along axis 0 using the composite trapezoidal rule.

Here’s an example:

import numpy as np

# Sample data represented as a 2D-array.
y = np.array([[0, 1, 2], [2, 3, 4]])
x = np.array([0, 0.5, 1])

# Compute the integral along axis 0 using list comprehension.
integral_oneliner = [np.trapz(y[:, i], x) for i in range(y.shape[1])]

print(integral_oneliner)

Output:

[1.0, 2.0, 3.0]

This succinct approach uses list comprehension to apply np.trapz over each column of array y, integrating with respect to the values in x. It is another way to achieve the same result with a minimalist twist.

Summary/Discussion

  • Method 1: NumPy’s trapz Function. A reliable and efficient built-in function. Best suited for quick implementations with minimal overhead. However, it lacks the flexibility of a custom implementation.
  • Method 2: Custom Implementation with NumPy. Offers deep insights and customization capabilities. It is useful for educational purposes but is more prone to errors than using a built-in solution.
  • Method 3: SciPy’s integrate.trapz. Functionally similar to NumPy’s version, it serves as an alternative when already working within the SciPy ecosystem. Not necessary if NumPy is sufficient for the task.
  • Method 4: Cumulative Trapezoidal Rule. Extremely useful for obtaining the integral values at intermediate points. However, it may be overkill for simple integration tasks where only the final value is needed.
  • Bonus Method 5: List Comprehension with NumPy. Provides a compact, Pythonic way to perform integration. However, lack of clarity may make the code harder to read for those unfamiliar with list comprehensions or NumPy.